Rev. Shojun Ogi: "Re-Focusing Buddhism in Modern Japanese Society: New Dimensions in Contemporary Japanese Buddhism"

Thursday, March 8, 2018

5:30 pm

TBA

Sponsored by:
Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford

Abstract:

Historically, especially after World War II, Japanese Buddhist temples became focused mainly on conducting funeral rituals, various commemorative memorials, the selling of talismans, and conducting prayer rituals in the name of good fortune, happiness and safety. This led Japanese society, including both Buddhist priests and public at large to come to believe that Buddhism was only relevant regarding death or wishes.

However, recognizing the declining position of Buddhism in contemporary Japan, some Buddhist priests have begun creating and implementing a variety of new activities and ideas in their attempts to revitalize the teaching of Buddha to deal with contemporary needs in modern society.

Bio:

Rev. Shojun Ogi

Born in 1982, Ogi is the vice resident priest of Choshoji Temple which belongs to the Jodo Shinshu Hongwanji-ha sect in Yamaguchi, Japan.  He earned a BA from Ryukoku University and an MA from Graduate Theological Union/Institute of Buddhist Studies in Berkeley, CA. In 2011 he completed a one-year Residential Fellow Program at the Harvard Divinity School. He has given many lectures on Buddhism at temples, universities, and seminars through his non-sectarian Buddhist promotional activities and developed a unique introduction to the Buddha’s teachings via the mass media on national television and radio programs in Japan. In addition, he has written and translated many articles and books on Buddhism for the contemporary world.

Distinguished Buddhist Practitioner Lecture Series

When:
Thursday, March 8, 2018
5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Where:
TBA
Admission:

Free and open to public

Tags:

Arts Lecture / Reading International Humanities 

Audience:
General Public, Faculty/Staff, Students, Alumni/Friends, Members
Contact:
650.721.6609, tanya@stanford.edu