A Conversation with Karen Joy Fowler

Thursday, October 5, 2017

7:00 pm

Sapp Center, Room 111 Map

Sponsored by:
McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society, Creative Writing Program

This event is part of the Technology & Human Values series. Fowler is one of several authors this year, who will speak about their work in relation to ethics and science fiction. 

After her reading, Karen will be in conversation with Scott Hutchins (Creative Writing).

KAREN JOY FOWLER is the author of three story collections and six novels, including We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, which won the PEN/Faulkner Award as well as the California Book Award for Fiction for 2013, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize the first year the prize was open to Americans.  She is also the author of The Jane Austen Book Club, which was on the New York Times bestseller list for nineteen weeks and was made into a major motion picture. In addition, her novel Sister Noon was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. Consistently acclaimed by critics, most of her titles have been New York Times Notable Books and named to many best-of-year lists.

Fowler’s lectures are filled with same imagination, sharp wit, and honesty that fill the pages of her book. A master of multiple genres, including science fiction, fantasy, literary fiction and short stories, Fowler’s lectures have wide-appeal for book lovers of all types.

Fowler is also the co-founder of the James Tiptree, Jr. Award and the current president of the Clarion Foundation (also known as Clarion San Diego).

Born and raised in an academic family in Bloomington, Indiana, she holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in South Asian Studies from the University of California, Berkeley.  She lived for many years in Davis, California, and now lives in Santa Cruz. For more information on this Speaker please visit www.prhspeakers.com.

SCOTT HUTCHINS is a former Truman Capote fellow in the Wallace Stegner Program at Stanford University. His work has appeared in Story QuarterlyFive Chapters, The Owls, The Rumpus, The New York Times, San Francisco Magazine and Esquire, and was recently set to music. He is the recipient of two major Hopwood awards and the Andrea Beauchamp prize in short fiction. In 2006 and 2010, he was an artist-in-residence at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. His novel A Working Theory of Love was a San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2012 and has been translated into nine languages.

When:
Thursday, October 5, 2017
7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Where:
Sapp Center, Room 111 Map
Admission:

Free & open to the public. Parking for Sapp Center: in front of the Cantor Center, Lomita Dr. & in front of Bing Concert Hall, Lasuen St. Except for the Oval, all Visitor, "A", and "C" parking spots are free & available after 4pm. 

Tags:

Arts Lecture / Reading Humanities Literary 

Audience:
General Public, Faculty/Staff, Students, Alumni/Friends
Contact:
650-736-6247, ebennet@stanford.edu